HP: “We want to make the IT industry more feminine”

HP: "We want to make the IT industry more feminine"

“Digital equality”: a buzzword that should not be missing in any current debate about equal opportunities and equal rights. At the same time, the pandemic has shown that education – and thus the opportunities – depend more than ever on social conditions. […]

“Digital equality”: a buzzword that should not be missing in any current debate about equal opportunities and equal rights. At the same time, the pandemic has shown that education – and thus the opportunities – depend more than ever on social conditions. At HP, we have fixed “equality or diversity” in our self-image for many years. In order to overcome the digital divide, access to a PC and the Internet is a prerequisite. But that’s not all. It takes digital competence to be able to fully exploit the potential of technology. There is a need for less prejudice and a lived equality. The figures show that far fewer women than men still have access to technology, are less likely to opt for technical training or work in technical professions. Coincidence? Technology is far from gender-neutral. The pandemic has shown that equal opportunities are also and initially influenced by origin and the digital divide.

In order to reduce such inhibitions, different starting points are needed. At HP, we are working on two international programs: With “Partnership and Technology for Humanity (PATH)”, we want to help women and girls, people of different backgrounds and religious affiliations, as well as people with disabilities to have better access to technology. With long-term strategic partnerships such as the “Girl Rising” initiative, we bring new content and curricula into the classrooms: directly to the girls and to the teaching staff and to the parents. So we have already been able to reach five million students, students and teachers.

At the same time, it is about empowering women for IT careers – making the industry more feminine. We are currently one of the leading technology companies – with 25 percent of female executives reporting directly to the management; 32 percent at director level or higher; 22 percent in IT and technology; 29 percent in sales and an average of 57 percent in the areas of law, finance, HR, marketing and communication. But that’s not all. By 2030, we are aiming for at least 50/50 gender equality in management positions and want to increase the proportion of women in the technical and engineering sectors to at least 30 percent.

I am proud to have been working in a company for over 30 years. A company that not only pursues equal opportunities in all areas on paper, but also understands it as a central element of the corporate culture. An inclusive working environment is a matter of course for me. Women and men have a maximum of flexibility for their daily work due to free time allocation and goal-oriented leadership. The best conditions for the often required compatibility of work and family. Mixed teams, intercultural, with a wide variety of origins, religious affiliation and mixed men and women are the ones who have advanced our company with sometimes surprising solutions. I am convinced of that. So I will continue to talk about equality issues, encourage girls to technical training. To judge and promote people according to their potential and their commitment and not according to their origin. With this in mind: I am looking forward to many people applying for our currently advertised positions, which will help to make our team at HP Austria even more diverse and thus more successful.

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